NILES LAB-

CURRENT GRADUATE STUDENTS AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

Luis Alexis Rodríguez-Cruz is a Food Systems Ph.D. candidate at the University of Vermont. He is interested in how policies shape our food systems, regarding food security and sustainability in island territories. He is also interested in how understanding farmers perspectives, cultural backgrounds, and beliefs shape how they adapt to withstand climate-related events. Currently he is analyzing data from a survey of Puerto Rican farmers (n=405) following Hurricane Maria. Luis is from Puerto Rico, where he conducted research on communitarian factors related to food safety issues among small scale commercial fishermen, and research to develop culturally-appropriate education material to prevent childhood obesity. His goal is to go back to Puerto Rico with the required skillset to lead research that helps the Puerto Rican food system. Learn more about Luis' work here.

Devon Johnson is a Master’s student in the Food Systems program at the University of Vermont. She earned Bachelor’s degrees in Environmental Studies and Policy studies at Elon University. At Elon she served as the volunteer coordinator for the university farm through Campus Kitchen, a national non-profit organization that takes excess food on college campuses and reallocates it to those in need. In this role her primary responsibilities were educating students about proper organic farming techniques, as well as the severity of food insecurity in the school’s surrounding area. This role led her to become the assistant-farm manager and inspired her to pursue a graduate degree in Food Systems. Her current research focus is climate change adaptation needs among small, medium, and beginning farmers in Vermont. She plans to create a set of resources concerning climate change adaptation for farmers, agricultural experts, and policy makers as a result of this research.

Maya Moore Maya is the pursuing a PhD in Food Systems, having spent the last decade working in the conservation and development field, mainly in Madagascar but also in Thailand and Guatemala.  Originally from Northern Maine, she is excited to return to her New England roots.  She holds degrees in Biology, French and Sustainable International Development, and is predominantly interested in seeking out interdisciplinary answers to the challenges of food security in the face of climate change, as it relates to human well-being and tropical biodiversity protection. Her current research questions pertain to the ways in which smallholder farmers are experiencing and perceiving climate change, how this impacts land use decisions and ties into conservation strategy in tropical systems where agricultural pressure is the leading cause of deforestation. Other interests include organizational development, gender and grassroots movements. She loves to travel, experience different cultures and try the (street) food!

Carolyn Hricko is currently a PhD student in food systems, beginning in August 2019.  She is also a Gund Fellow.

ALUMNI STUDENTS AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTS

Serge Wiltshire finished his Ph.D. in Food Systems at the University of Vermont in May 2019. His research interests lie in the areas of computer modeling of complex agroecological systems, behavioral economics experimentation, and computational analysis of food systems network structures; with an eye toward improving food system resilience. Previous and ongoing research efforts include the development of strategies to promote the adoption of best management practices among Vermont’s dairy farmers, computer modeling of livestock production chain network structures in order to reduce epidemiological vulnerability, and analysis of public policy solutions which could reduce the impact of soil and water degradation, climate change, changing diets, and other factors on future global food security.  Serge is currently a post-doctorate at University of California Berkeley.

Thomas Wentworth was a research assistant in the Niles Lab in 2018-2019. He supported the lab by providing research, analysis, and data visualization for a wide range of projects in the intersection of food and climate. Thomas studied Conservation Psychology at Middlebury College, where he designed a device that gives real-time feedback on electric consumption, managed a student-run organization committed to providing access to affordable and fresh foods (Middlebury Foods), and received first place in a DOE student-design competition. Although he has a strong interest in renewable energy, since graduating he has followed his passion for food systems: he worked with Vermont Farm to Plate to create a comprehensive database of Vermont producers and distributors, and spent one day a week as a farmhand on Golden Russet Farm. Thomas also worked previously for Staple Health (a preventative care health-tech startup) designing interactive mapping technology. He is committed to working on food security and the climate crisis, and was thrilled to be a part of the lab. He is currently traveling and seeing the world!

Emilie Riddle was a Dietetics master's student at the University of Vermont, finishing in May 2018. She is interested in exploring the ways that dietitians work towards a more just and sustainable food system that supports health at all levels. Through her supervised practice experience she is building a solid foundation of skills and tools to support individuals and communities in their journey towards a healthy and balanced life. Emilie’s research project focused on exploring the prevalence of food insecurity and populations most impacted at postsecondary institutions. She analyzed data from the University of Vermont Campus Food Security Survey to identify disparities and trends in campus groups at potential risk of food insecurity. The results of this analysis will inform future iterations of the survey, and provide context for campus discussions about strategies to address this issue.  Emilie now resides in North Carolina and works as a registered dietician.

Olivia Peña was a student in the accelerated Master's Food Systems graduate program, finishing in August 2018. Beginning her undergraduate studies at UVM, Olivia took opportunities to impact different scales of food systems On campus, she is a member of the Real Food Working Group, which works with UVM Dining to create a more sustainable campus food system. In 2015, she researched and published an article on diversity education in land-grant universities nationally. She also works with the Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security group through the Gund Institute to study global climate smart agricultural practices. Olivia graduated in Spring 2017 with a Bachelor of Science in Food Systems. Her specific interests center around food and agricultural policy. As a masters student, Olivia focused her research on communications and outreach strategies in Vermont for Farm Bill policy development, working with local constituent groups and federal policymakers. She published the Vermonters Guide to the Farm Bill including executive summaries for policymakers, community members, and organizations across Vermont.  She is currently working with Hunger Free Vermont.

 Alana Chriest was a master's student in the Food Systems program, finishing in September 2017. Alana grew up in small dairy valley in Washington State, and spent many years working for multiple restaurants, including two of her family’s own. This set the stage for a lifetime of critical food systems thinking and the implications of modern society’s food paradigm. Her curiosity and formal learning focuses on what she considers the most profound aspect of food systems – human behavior. In 2013 she earned a BA in Sociology, with minors in Philosophy and Environmental Studies, from the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). Alana’s past research includes student food insecurity, and labeling effects on consumer behavior. For her thesis, she investigated the effects social capital on community food security during and after climate shocks in rural areas of central Vermont severely affected by the extreme weather event Tropical Storm Irene in 2011. Before entering graduate school, she served an AmeriCorps term with the American Red Cross, served on the UAA Business Service Working Group, and was part of the Real Food Challenge National Standards Council. She is now a PhD student at Ohio State University in Natural Resources.

Courtney Hammond Wagner is a postdoctoral scholar in sustainable groundwater management at Water in the West at Stanford University and a former member of the Niles Lab. As an environmental social scientist, Courtney’s research broadly aims to understand how we design incentives, rules and policies to collectively change behavior in water resource dilemmas to improve community well-being and ecological outcomes. Courtney received a Ph.D. in Natural Resources from the University of Vermont in 2019, which focused on policy design for declining water quality from agricultural nutrient runoff. Courtney also worked with Dr. Niles on a project to identify the role of farmer social norms and fairness perceptions in California’s 2014 Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) policy process. Courtney is now building on this SGMA research in her postdoc at Stanford where she is focused on two additional aspects of SGMA: the mandated use of climate information in groundwater sustainability plans and the role of incentives in farmer groundwater use. While at UVM Courtney was a graduate student fellow at the Gund Institute for the Environment and had a graduate research fellowship through the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council funded Economics for the Anthropocene program. Courtney also has a BA in Psychology from Dartmouth College.

350 Carrigan Wing, 109 Carrigan Drive

University of Vermont

Burlington, VT 05405

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